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51 Also have marriage in Kittery, York County, Maine. MARTYN, ELIZABETH (I1198)
 
52 Also known as Joseph Bernard.

Bernard came west from New Brunswick to Montana in the early 1890's with his brother Ben and an Ellis cousin. He spent the remainder of his life in Corvallis, Montana where he and his wife farmed their land. 
SMYTH, BERNARD JOSEPH (I1866)
 
53 Also mentioned in mother's congratulatory letter to Albert McQuoid's in 1973, Margo was a championship 5-pin bowler and president of Bowling Association in 1977 on 50th anniversary of organization. MCQUOID, MARGARET LILLIAN "MARGO" (I12669)
 
54 Alta was a nurse; Charles worked for General Electric. RYDER, ALTA MYRTLE (I4366)
 
55 Although Asenath died very young, she left two sons, and all are buried in the Saint John's Anglican Cemetery, Highfield, NB; there are headstones for all three. [Dana Ryder] RYDER, ASENATH (I2777)
 
56 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I4491)
 
57 Amasa was a school teacher, "who taught in many area schools, such as Canaan Road School, Sussex Corner School, and Anagance Ridge School Ridge School." He wrote a book of poetry, which survives in his finely crafted handscript, of which the following is a sample:

Did you ever teach a country school
And sit beneath the noise
From 9 A.M. to 4 P.M.
Of 40 girls and boys?

If so, you will with me agree
That take it as a rule
The hardest work you ever did
Was teach a country School.

References: Dana Ryder, a manuscript book of poetry by Amasa Ryder, in the possession of Dana Ryder; NBHavelock census 1901 T6441. 
RYDER, AMASA "BLASIE" (I2739)
 
58 Ancel or Ancil? LYDA, ANCIL MYVERT (I12350)
 
59 Andrew was from Grand Lake. Dana Ryder writes, "Andrew and Sarah moved from Canada to Kennebunk, Maine. They raised their family in Kennebunk and both died there. As a young boy I went to visit uncle Andrew and his daughter Sadie many times. After Andrew and Sadie died the family lost touch with the rest of Andrew's family." [Dana Ryder] RYDER, SARAH (I2736)
 
60 Ann Stead of Tracadie was a spinster. They were married by L.C. Jenkins of St. Pauls Angelican Church. [Lucy Fandek] STEAD, ANN (I3202)
 
61 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I5095)
 
62 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I4325)
 
63 As of 1999, our earliest written knowledge of Robert Carter and Mariam Kennedy is church birth records of their children being born at the Parish of Rerrick in the County of Kirkcudbright, Scotland. The Parish of Rerrick is situated seven miles south of the town of Kirkcudbright close to the ruins of Dundrennon Abbey, which dates to the year 1142. Many of the Scottish farmhouses of today date back 600 years. A visit to Scotland provides a realization of how young our North American countries are.

When Robert and Mariam's first two children Agnes and Margaret were born, Robert was working as a laborer at Shawhill Farm. When their last five children were born Mary, Allan, May, Isabel and Robert, Robert the father was listed in the birth records as a cottsman at Rascarral Farm. Research reveals that a cottsman was a supervisor of plowmen. This information and some knowledge of that period's history provides insight to the reasons why Robert and Mariam would move to Canada in 1831. We can not confirm Roberts actual birth date but estimate that he was in his forties when the move took place. For a person in the 1800's this would place him in the fall of his life. Imagine Robert and Mariam Carter leaving Scotland for Canada with seven children, on a voyage which could take 1-3 months and the almost certain knowledge that they would never return to their homeland.

History tells us that Scotland's landowners had many tenant farmers on their lands in the early 1800's. The tenant farmers were supposed to raise crops and provide the landowner with a share for rent, as well as provide plowing time to the landowner. When you visit Scotland today most pubs offer a plowman's lunch, reminiscent of these early days.

In the early 1800's there was a growing demand for the wool and mutton. Because raising sheep was more profitable than sharecropping the Scottish landowners wanted to turn their property into sheep farms but there was the problem of how to remove the tenant farmers and their families. But, then came the settling of Canada and the promise of 100 acres of free land - Canada was, of course, part of the British Empire, so the Scottish landowners bought passage for their tenant farmers and their families to Canada. The landowner was happy to free his land for raising sheep and the tenant farmers would never in his life imagine owning 100 acres of land. Imagine the tenant farmers surprise to see the land covered with virgin timber. Like today, Scotland had very few trees in the 1800's and the average tenant farmer had never cut a tree down in his life!

Why then would Robert and Mariam Carter move from Scotland to Canada where Robert was in his forties? It would appear that being a cottsman (supervisor of plowmen) was a dying occupation and they had to take-up residence in the new land and claim their 100 acres of free forest! Why would he choose Kouchibouguac, New Brunswick, Canada? The historical information we find of the village of Kouchibouguac shows that several men were building ships along the Kouchibouguac River. The early settlers to this area were from Scotland - if you visit the Kirkcudbright area cemeteries you find many of the same names - Graham, MacDonald and Tweedie. The history of the village indicates that these ships were taking much needed lumber and fish to Scotland. On the return trip were bringing families back to Canada. This may have been why Robert and Mariam found their way to Kouchibouguac.

Unfortunately we have not been able to find definitive information regarding the parents of Robert Carter and Mariam Kennedy. Passed down stories to our mother Elsie Isabel (Carter) Ryder told us that our immigrants Robert and Mariam came from Kirkcudbright, Scotland and this helped us find their children's birth records in the Parish of Rerrick seven miles out of town. We, however, do not know where Robert and Mariam were born, married or even their parents names. Normally your parent's names appear on documents when you are born, married or die. Since we believe they were born someplace in Scotland and died in or around Kouchibouguac where there was no newspaper and church records have not survived, we do not know if he is buried with his wife Mariam since stone engraving has been omitted. Some passed down stories indicate that Robert had left his farm. This information cannot be substantiated so we do not know the date, place or final resting-place of our immigrant ancestor Robert Carter.

Perhaps, someday someone in the Carter lineage will locate a family Bible belonging to one of Robert and Mariam's children and we might then find Robert and Mariam's parent's names. Should anyone have or find any of this important information please let us know so we can write the rest of the story and possibly locate our distant relatives in Scotland. [Ernest W. Ryder]

References: Ernest W. Ryder, Carter Immigrants Arrive In New Brunswick, Canada; Dana C. Ryder; E. Isabel (Carter) Ryder. . 
CARTER, ROBERT (I223)
 
64 At the time of his death, Ardee was working as a shipyard welder in the Los Angeles area. There is some family argument whether his name was 'Ardee' or merely the initals 'R.D.' If the latter, no one has been able to suggest what the initials stand for. RYDER, ARDEE CRANDALL (I4236)
 
65 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3398)
 
66 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3399)
 
67 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3402)
 
68 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3396)
 
69 Attended U.S.M. and Westbrook College. DUBE, CHERYL (I3400)
 
70 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3395)
 
71 Bass River, Kent County, N.B. LEBLANC, FRANK (I12718)
 
72 Beacon
Feb 5/1903
Terrible Accident
William McQuoid Accidentally Shot by His Son
On Sunday Mr. William McQuoid, manager of Sir William Van Horne's farm on Minister's Island, was accidentally shot by his son Orville. The son was handling a small rifle-the same weapon that killed Fletcher Denley some years ago. By some mischance the lad's clothing caught on the hammer and the gun was exploded, the shot penetrating the stomach of his father who was standing nearby. The wounded man walked to his home unaided and Drs. Gove and Wade were hastily summoned. They probed for the bullet but were unable to find it. A surgical operation was considered necessary. Dr. Atherton, of Fredericton, was sent for, and when he arrived on Monday the bullet was successfully removed. The wound is a very serious one and it is feared the injured man cannot recover. He has a strong constitution and this may help to pull him through. Great sympathy is felt for the family, and particular for the young lad, who was the innocent cause of the accident.
At last accounts the injured man was holding his own and the physicians were feeling a little encouragement. A trained nurse arrived from Fredericton yesterday.

Moved to Winnipeg. Reported visiting St. John from "the West" July 1916. Obit says worked for Business Systems Ltd. in Winnipeg for 47 years, died Oct. 16, 1968. Past Master of Lodge #114. 
MCQUOID, ORVILLE E. (I2415)
 
73 Beacon
July 8/1897
Charles McQuoid, the four year old son of William McQuoid, Minister's Island, split his nose open with a nail or some other sharp instrument during the temporary absence from home of his parents on Wednesday last. He was brought in town and the wound dressed by Dr. Wade, who found it necessary to put several stitches in it.

Served and died as a Private in Royal New Brunswick Regiment, 26th Battalion during The Great War.

Mentioned in local paper as one of the first local boys to enlist and the first one to fall in combat. "Deeply regret to inform you that Pte. Charles L. McQuoid infantry, is officially reported killed in action, June 29th." Lt. Colonel W. Beattie sent a letter home saying he died instantly after being shot in the head by a sniper. And said the unit had nothing but praise for him. Sgt. W. Steed, his platoon leader, said "dear Charlie" "he was an awful good boy" and that he "went at his post, without suffering". Last letter home (dated June 23rd) published in local paper "captured a German rifle, trying to send it home" that he captured a lot of German paraphernalia and sold them to officers for high prices. "Have Vincent and Fraser left St. John yet?" "Heavy casualties for Canadians and we have need for many replacements." "The White Cliffs of Dover and the blue waters was one of the prettiest sights I have ever seen." His brothers were in Valcartier Military Training Camp, Quebec at the time. 
MCQUOID, CHARLES LOREN (I2413)
 
74 Ben came west from New Brunswick to Montana with his brother Bernard and an Ellis cousin in the early 1890's. At first, he lived at Corvallis and Hamilton, Montana. Later, he moved to American Falls, Idaho where he farmed his land until his death. SMYTH, BENJAMIN RICHARD (I1861)
 
75 Benjamin spent his early years in New Canaan, and was active in land transactions there. He is listed as a Corporal on the Muster Rolls of Capt Keith's Company, September 28 1846. On 18 Nov 1847 he signed a quit claim in exchange for 50 giving up any claim to lot 27 of his father Ebenezer's grant.

He married Mary Alward, but no record of the ceremony has been located. However, tragedy struck this family about 1848, a newspaper report reading: "Died, New Canaan (Queen's County) 28th ult, Mary, wife of Benjamin Rider; aged 24; left husband and two children."

It may have been the death of his wife that decided Benjamin to leave the country. Nellie Rider says that about 1850 he moved to Santa Barbara CA, where he died about 1894; descendants, if any, not known. He is not in the 1851 census for the New Canaan. And he is not in the 1850 census for Santa Barbara; indeed, the 1850 census for all of California is indexed, but does not show a Benjamin Rufus Rider. It's quite possible , of course, that he arrived in California after 1850, but research for him after that date has not been done.

References: Dana Ryder; Nellie Rider; Fremont Rider; Rowland Corey; LRIS; Muster Rolls of Capt Keith's Company, September 8 1846; Vital Statistics From New Brunswick Newspapers, Vol 12 #1807; Ronald Vern Jackson and Gary Ronald Teeples, California 1850 Census Index, Accelerated Indexing System 3346 South Orchard Drive, Bountiful Ut 84010; Land Registry Queens #4744. 
RIDER, BENJAMIN RUFUS (I2646)
 
76 Bertha had a child that her parents raised. PERKINS, BERTHA (I9251)
 
77 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I5055)
 
78 Birth year possibly 1924. HODSON, RUTH "DONNA" (I12787)
 
79 Born Ariel William Hillock, he changed his name to William Ariel Hillock. He had the nicknames of "Bill" and "Duke." HILLOCK, ARIEL WILLIAM JR. (I555)
 
80 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I13381)
 
81 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I13387)
 
82 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I12554)
 
83 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I13055)
 
84 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I13075)
 
85 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I13071)
 
86 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I13072)
 
87 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I13073)
 
88 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I13074)
 
89 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I13065)
 
90 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I13068)
 
91 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I13069)
 
92 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I12230)
 
93 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I12233)
 
94 Born premature and died shortly after birth. [Smyth book] JORDAN, (BOY) (I12764)
 
95 Born premature and died shortly after birth. [Smyth book] JORDAN, (GIRL) (I12765)
 
96 Both Annie and Isaiah are buried in the Baptist Cemetery on Maple Street in Chipman, New Brunswick. CARTER, ANNIE DOROTHEA (I8915)
 
97 Both Horton and Nancy are deaf mutes. Dana write, "Nancy and Horton attended the Winnipeg School for the deaf, where they met, and after Horton left the school the courtship continued by correspondence over a long period. The marriage took place in Unity SK, with two interpreters to assist The Reverend H.E. Wright, who officiated.

"Horton was a stucco mason, and worked in Saskatchewan and Alberta. They retired to enderby BC, where the daughters held a fiftieth wedding anniversary for them on 11 October 1980.

"I visited Horton in B.C in 1986, and my son played frisbee with him. He was 80 years old and full of fun and good health." [Dana Ryder] 
RYDER, HORTON JOSEPH (I4296)
 
98 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I9257)
 
99 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I4731)
 
100 Burial date from gravestone says he died 18 April 1897 (age72) and the burial records state he died 21 April 1897 at age 70. Records also at Broadalbin United Church, PEI. 1891 Census... he says he is 64 yrs old. Family group sheet I have states marriage 25 April 1850.

This Simon Day and family are in the 1861 census, 1 b. England (Simon), 1 b. Island (Mary Ann Andrews) and 5 children. They listed nothing on age of these children, males or females. But they had 1 horse, 5 cows, 8 sheep and 3 hogs. they had 50 acres of land (2nd grade) located on Little Rennie Rd, Wheatley River on which they raised 1 ton of hay, 18 bushels of wheat, 7 bushels of barley, 200 of oats, 30 of buckwheat and 150 of potatoes. They made 40 pounds of butter. Simon himself must have met the census taker in the barn. He couldnt remember ages of his children, but knew his crops. Simon must have been living on Lot 23 given to him by his father. I show Simon living in Wellington, PEI on Lot 23. Sources have been: Church records from Trinity Church, Charlottetown, PEI; Vital Records from PEI; 1861 Census of PEI. [Lucy Fandek] 
DAY, SIMON WILLIAM (I2453)
 

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